Pneuma Springs Logo

Pneuma Springs

Publishing

About Us   |   Contact Us   |   BOOK SEARCH

 

            |

     Home             Our Authors             Publishing             Online Store             eBooks             Become a Reviewer             Book Videos             

News and Events

       
   
       

View Headlines

 

 

Pneuma Springs Publishing

 

 

 

Happy New Year

 

Pneuma Springs Logo

 

 

Back to to

 

07 December 2013: A video for Sue Hampton's new release - Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas.

 

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Watch Book Trailer

 

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

04 December 2013: Photos of Sue Hampton during school visits to read 'Aliens and Angels' and review by an eight-year-old.

 

Click here to read the Reviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the book

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

 

Back to to

 

02 December 2013: A review of 'The Life that Jack Built' by Harry Riley*, an author and a member of the Eastwood Booktown Development Group.

 

The Review - `The Life that Jack Built - Secrets of a School Teacher'


"Having read and immensely enjoyed John Butler’s previous books: ‘In Search Of Ireland Again’ and ‘Serendipity’ I was eager to read ‘Secrets of a School Teacher - The Life that Jack Built’.

I must confess I had met the author on a number of occasions at Eastwood Writers Group manuscript meetings, and had heard John read extracts from this work. These brief snippets had already whetted my appetite for eventually reading the completed novel. I was not to be disappointed.

In the story Yorkshire-man Jack Forrest becomes a schoolteacher. He is an academic high achiever and a self-confessed philanderer. Being a supply teacher his work takes him to many schools in various locales throughout the UK, and as such he gains experience of teaching in Grammar: Sec. Mod: Infant and Junior school situations.

Being fit, young and personable he is presented with many opportunities to dally with big-eyed, attractive young women teachers. In short, to enjoy the sort of life many young men only get to dream about.

During long months of the Schools Out summer holidays we find Jack travelling around in his iconic British sports car, doing whatever casual work he cares to choose and getting into and out of lots of scrapes in the process, some of them quite dangerous. To my mind, another title for the novel could have been Lucky Jack.

Eventually though, like so many carefree bachelors, he meets his match, as a good woman attempts to pin him down in the time honoured way.

You might think the author knew his subject almost as well as he knew himself, writing with a wicked wit and a fast, straightforward, page-turning style that left you wanting much more.

Unfortunately John Butler died in 2012 after completing his novel, but before publication, and it’s a great pity we are to be deprived of more of this well-travelled author’s creative literature on our bookshelves."

 

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

John Butler is the author of Serendipity - A miscellany of short stories’, 'In Search Of Ireland Again' and 'The Life that Jack Built - Secrets of a School Teacher'

 

Back to to

 

22 November 2013: The latest reviews of Sue Hampton's new release - Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas.

 

The Reviews

These stories are warm and delightfully different approaches to the Christmas season, and each carries its own moral which children will easily be able to understand and appreciate.  There is also humour to be found here and each of the stories is illustrated with clear and charming drawings, which will definitely appeal to the reader.  Sue Hampton herself did the illustrations for ‘Aliens and Angels’, whilst the other two stories have drawings by children from two local First Schools. All three tales offer a perfect introduction to the true meaning of Christmas.

In Aliens and Angels Robbie longs to be an angel in the Christmas pageant at school, but, after his long blond curls are cut off he thinks it will never happen.  He is cast as an alien in the play, but just can’t seem to get the actions right.  His best friend Hannah wants to be an alien rather than an angel … and then on the night before the play, they both discover that ‘Nothing can stop them’ achieving their dreams.

Not without a Carrot! is a re-telling of the nativity story as seen through the eyes of Trouble the donkey.  Trouble will only work if he’s rewarded with carrots, but, after he carries Mary to Bethlehem, he forgets all about carrots and is proud to work for nothing when he is part of the miracle of the baby Jesus’s birth.  From then on his cry is no longer ‘Not without carrots’ but instead he unselfishly declares ‘Not without the baby!’

And finally in Bootee for Etta, Etta is left with neighbours on Christmas Day when her mother is rushed into hospital and her Dad is working in New York.  Etta is sad and unhappy, particularly when being teased by Pavel, the neighbours’ son.  Then, in a cracker Etta finds a tiny box with a little lamb inside – just when she has been longing for her own toy lamb from home.  When Pavel finds the box, he sees  something completely different inside it, and then Etta’s Dad finds another box on the plane bringing him home.  The contents of these boxes change all of their lives forever …

Susan Curran, editor and creative writing tutor

 

 

I loved this book and thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Each story is different but all centre around the theme of Christmas, so this book will make an ideal Christmas present for young and old alike. The stories move from a modern day school Nativity, with a little boy who longs to fly like an Angel, to the very first Nativity, when Trouble the donkey's heart is touched and changed by his encounter with the birth of the baby Jesus, and finally, to Etta, whose worst Christmas very soon becomes life changing for her, her family and the people around her, and ends up becoming the best Christmas Day ever.

The illustrations, pictures drawn by primary school children, are wacky and lots of fun. I recommend buying this book and reading it as part of your Christmas anthology, to your children and to each other, each year. It reminds us that Christmas is about much more than the turkey, tinsel, too many presents and a big Credit Card bill in January.

Kerry Hoult, Salopeot magazine

 

About the book

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

18 November 2013: Ebony Eyes - a short story by author Neal James*, featured on Amber Valley Info Website.


Ebony Eyes

Her name was Carly, Carly Richardson, and Ricky had never seen anyone so beautiful in his, as yet, short life. At five feet seven, with dark brown hair and a smile that could charm the birds out of the trees, she was everything that he imagined a woman could possibly be. Her eyes were like pools, and he would willingly have drowned in them. She was twenty-two to his twenty-three, and it had seemed as though they were destined for each other. She hailed from Springfield, a smallish town just outside of Nashville, and Ricky had used that as the ice-breaker, asking her how Homer and Marge were doing. It made her laugh although he imagined she’d heard it all before.

Ricky Madison was a Chicago boy born and bred – he lived and died with the White Sox in summer and the Bears in winter. He loved his job at Mullins Motor Mechanic in Lincoln Park, and could strip down and rebuild the engine of most cars you’d care to name. He’d been there since high school and although the older guys sometimes gave him a hard time, he took it all on the chin.. Had to keep the new kid on the block under control didn’t they? Hell, he’d been there almost six years but to the rest of them he was still a baby.

He’d been out with his buddies one Saturday when Joey, his best friend, had suggested the trip to Orlando. Why they hadn’t thought of it before was a mystery, but by the end of the following week all the arrangements were in place and they were on American Airlines Flight 714 out of O’Hare for a week at Disney World. It was a place he’d wanted to go since he was in short pants, but mom and dad never had the money. Now he was earning for himself things were different, and it wasn’t like he had a family to support.

They’d spent the first few days messing around on the rides, eating too much, drinking way too much and generally acting like some stupid bunch of kids, when they bumped into a group of girls out on a similar vacation. The numbers were equal and a pairing off was almost inevitable. Joey had smiled at Carly but her eyes had been fixed only on Ricky. There was an immediate chemistry between them and Joey slapped him on the back, winked and strolled off arm-in-arm with one of the others. Moving around the theme park during the daytime, the group split up after dinner to go off in pairs. Ricky and Carly ended up at the beach, just holding hands and staring into each others’ eyes. Strange – all alone with a girl and all he could do was gaze into her eyes, her beautiful eyes, so beautiful that he’d never noticed their colour until right now. They were brown, dark brown, no…not dark brown, almost black.

The holiday was over too soon, and on the day they all packed up to go home Ricky and Carly exchanged addresses and telephone numbers promising to keep in touch. Despondently, he told himself that never happened. She would go back to her boyfriend and their meeting would be nothing but a dim and distant, albeit pleasant, memory. He smiled as he and his buddies got off the plane back at an overcast and rainy O’Hare, shook the thoughts from his head and resigned himself to the daily grind back at the workshop.

The phone was ringing when he got to his apartment at the end of that first day back at work, and usually it was his mom ‘just checking that he’s gotten back alright’. Sometimes he wondered if she wanted to know that he’d changed his underpants each day.

“Hi mom, how’re you doin’?” He sighed, ready for the usual interrogation.

There was a silence at the other end before the voice he hadn’t expected cut in and sent his mind reeling back to Florida...

Click link to read full story here...

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

15 November 2013: Great reviews of Sue Hampton's new release - Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas

 

The Reviews

This book of 3 short stories conveys the warmth and happiness of Christmas. In Not Without a Carrot, Trouble’s stubbornness as a donkey and liking for carrots is superseded only by his love of baby Jesus. The other 2 stories have more magical themes: Aliens and Angels provides a mysterious angelic twist to the school nativity play; whilst in Bootee for Etta recipients of the 3 magical gifts convey a message of hope and happiness overcoming loneliness and despair. The stories can be enjoyed both for their simplicity, and also, by older children, for their underlying messages.

Sue Hampton, teacher and author of several children’s books, aims to write stories full of love, understanding and forgiveness. This book, illustrated by children from primary schools in Berkhamsted, will appeal to younger children of various ages, whilst also being enjoyed by adults. By illustrating the effect of hope and challenge, with the help of a little magic, in overcoming adversity, these stories offer a valuable, and unique, addition to children’s Christmas literature.

Sally Hickman, Abbey News, St Albans

 

Best Christmas book of the year!

My favourite author Sue Hampton has come up with a cracker of a book this festive season. 'Angels and Aliens' is a book of three short illustrated stories for children.

In the first story Robbie has to deal with not getting the part he most identifies with in the school play.  Sue's simple language enables us all to empathise with his initial excitement and subsequent disappointment.  Luckily with the help of his friends and a little celestial intervention, he is finally able to shine.

'Not without a carrot' is the second story and my favourite, due in part by the wonderful illustrations done by young children.  A unique take on the traditional nativity story, Trouble the donkey is irresistibly stubborn, but proves in the end to have a soft and gentle heart.

The final story deals with a young girl, forced to spend Christmas in unfamiliar surroundings whilst her mother lies ill in hospital.  Worried and alone, a Christmas miracle finally leads to a happy ending that did make me cry a little bit.

Buy this for your children, or even just yourself.  You won't be disappointed!

Joanne Bowers, librarian, Ipswich

 

 

All three stories are charming... inspirational and spiritual in quite a subtle and lovely way.

Rosie Press, Folkestone Healing

 

These quirky tales, vividly told, will appeal to adults as well as children. Ideal for reading aloud at bedtime on Christmas Eve.

Kathy Lee, author, for Boaters’ Fellowship magazine

 

All three stories are original and imaginative and Sue’s writing brings them magically to life. Children will love these stories which will fire their imagination and make them laugh and smile.

Clare Swatman, Berkhamsted Living

 

I loved this book and have bought it as a present for a grandchild. In the first story Robbie did not want to be an alien as most little boys would love to be, he wanted to be an angel and dance, he wanted to be different. The second story, about Trouble the donkey, describes his feelings about the birth of the baby Jesus. Even the most obstinate difficult donkey has a soft spot! I particularly loved the last story. I am sure all children will identify with poor Etta and realise that they are very lucky if they have everyone they love around them at Christmas. However it all comes right for her in the end.

Penny Shaw, U3A reading group, Watford

 

As a retired primary school teacher and author of children's stories, I thoroughly enjoyed this anthology of three Christmas stories. Aliens and Angels provided some beautiful imagery and a lesson in escaping from people's expectations, none of us should stereotype anyone! Not Without A Carrot stars Trouble the donkey and is told from her viewpoint, her name describes her character! A wonderful twist to a traditional story, which children will love. Bootee for Etta illustrates the important things in life and the differences between those that 'have' and those that don't. Very enjoyable and satisfying read with well rounded characters for a short story. I would recommend this book as an excellent Christmas read with some delightful illustrations from schoolchildren.

Sue Pettit, Watford Writers

 

 

About the book

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

09 November 2013: Neal James has been featured in the Morrisons 'Fresh News'.

 

Read the Morrisons 'Fresh News' Feature

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

06 November 2013: Candid reviews of Derek Smith's Wild Strawberries & No Cousin of Mine.

 

Wild Strawberries

"Evacuation was a horrible time for some children and for others it gave them a new life. Derek seems to belong to the latter group. His wartime experiences must be replicated around the country. Bathing in zinc baths, walking miles to school - in all sorts of weather, and trying to relate to and with the local children and adults. He captures all the escapades that children get up to - from bird nesting to swimming in dangerous waters. How did we all get away with it? Well, he tells a story that is so positive and I guess he regrets not going back sooner to his old haunts. Old and young should read this book as it tells an uplifting story of his early childhood. I strongly recommend this well written book. ."

Ken Newton

 

No Cousin of Mine - Interesting times

A well written book with some interesting experiences in Germany straight after the second world war. Of interest to those who want a well written tale that is easy going

Stephen Douglas

 

No Cousin of Mine - A good story well told

Very readable account of life as a conscript not long after World war 2. Written with a cool humour throughout

Chris k "Chris Knight

 

About the book:

This is the true story of a nine year old boy who, at the height of the Birmingham blitz, is transported from his ‘all mod cons’ big city home to the safety of a house in a remote south Staffordshire hamlet, a mile and a half from nowhere, where he finds himself living in domestic and sanitary conditions that have remained unaltered for over a thousand years – the culture shock to end all culture shocks.

 

Derek Smith is the author of two books: 'No Cousin of Mine' and 'Wild Strawberries'

 

Back to to

 

01 November 2013: Excellent reviews of Sue Hampton's new release - Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas.

 

The Reviews

I absolutely loved these stories. They all gave me that warm fuzzy Christmassy feeling. The descriptions in the stories are amazing and really help you to picture what's going on…This book deserves to be very successful. It is absolutely delightful. 

Heather Pretty, school librarian

 

 

I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.  Imaginative stories and great illustrations.  Well done.

Jenefer Llewllyn Ferguson, Teifi Scribblers

 

 

My reaction to reading these three stories was to marvel at the breadth of Sue's imagination. In the first story, from which the book takes its title, a young boy feels different from his classmates, he suffers from name calling and is quite unhappy with his part in the school nativity play. The story leads him through wonderful adventures of his imagination - or is it reality? I was not sure and it didn't seem to matter anyway - to a very satisfying conclusion.

The second story was first published in this newsletter after Sue read it for our crib service. I was again moved by its great joy and laughed at the humour.

The third story "Bootee for Etta" is a story of hope in a dark place for a young girl whose mother is rushed into hospital and she is bundled off to spend Christmas with her family’s cleaning lady.  She is worried about her mother, her father stranded at New York airport, hostility from the cleaner’s son and the unfamiliarity of the home she is staying in. But as with the first story, imagination runs riot, or is it reality and does it matter? A beautiful tale shot through with humour that can be read many times.

As a Christmas story book I think it will work for a younger child and be read many times by an older child, a super book that is to be highly recommended.

Christina Billington, Diocesan Lay Minister

 

 

I have had the privilege to read Aliens and Angels by Sue Hampton before many other young readers who I am sure are anxious to read. I do not want to give away much of the stories because I don't want to disappoint anyone in any way whatsoever. What I can say is as I started reading the book I straight away started to get into the first story, and then the second story called Not without a carrot. This story is based on a donkey called Trouble who doesn't do ANYTHING without a carrot, and oh my...the third story!!!! The third story is called Bootee for Etta. WHAT A BEAUTIFUL STORY! It creates mixed emotions throughout the story. This story was based on a little girl called Etta who was left without her parents on Christmas. You will have to read the story to understand why it was such an amazing story. This book is a great book for young readers or even as a gift for young keen readers on Christmas. It is coming out on the Thursday 26th September 2013. If you are looking for a special something for a child on Christmas, I suggest you go and buy this book in store. The colours and images of the book as seen in the image above are quite colourful and eye catching. It is for sale for £5.99. Visit www.suehamptonauthor.co.uk to find out more about this book. Great buy and I definitely recommend this book to anyone who has young children, grandchildren, nieces or nephews, cousins even brothers or sisters! I could easily read this book again..

Sophia Shah, 16. Comment on Published Bestsellers.com

 

 

Sue Hampton is a well-known local writer with over 20 books for children and young adults to her name. Her latest book, Aliens and Angels, is a collection of three stories with a Christmas theme. Sue’s stories are always beautifully written with rich visual imagery, and they are full of humour and imagination. Her new collection makes us see three familiar aspects of Christmas in a different light. The first story is about a boy who wanted to be an angel in his school nativity play rather than one of the aliens, which all have to be clumsy, spotty and hop about with their legs tied together. Nobody can understand what the problem is or why he doesn't like his role. The second story is about an obstinate donkey with a passion for carrots whose owner loses patience with her and sells her to someone called Joseph. The donkey takes to her new owners at once and starts working well for them, especially when she realises how much trouble Joseph goes to, to find her more carrots. She soon finds she has a very important job to do—taking Mary safely to Bethlehem. I liked the third story best because it had an unexpected twist and because it was about the familiar themes of family and loneliness at Christmas. It is a magical story about a little girl adrift without her family on Christmas Day. Everything starts out badly on Christmas Day but by the evening all is well and her wishes have been granted. Editor, Northchurch Parish magazine

Editor, Northchurch Parish magazine

 

 

About the book

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

19 October 2013: Review of 'Threads of Deceit' by Richard Nicholson.

 

The Review
"Neal James takes you on a fast paced tale of deceit and lies. There are twists and turns in every chapter, just when you think you've got it sussed everything changes. A real page turner."

Richard Nicholson

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds', 'Threads of Deceit' and  Full Marks.

 

Back to to

 

15 October 2013: Ronald Ooms will be signing copies of his new book, Silver Eagle, at Bastogne Barracks, Route de la Roche 40, Bastogne in Belgium

 

 

Date: Saturday 14 December 2013

Time: 13h00 - 18h00*

 

Date: Sunday 15 December 2013

Time: 09h00 - 12h00 & 13h00 - 18h00* * times are subject to change

 

The signing will be taking place during the 69th anniversary commemorations of the Battle of the Bulge, the so-called "Nuts Weekend."

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

We wish Ronald the very best with these event.

 

Back to to

 

12 October 2013: Great reviews of Sue Hampton's new release - Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas.

 

The Reviews

"Delightful short Christmas themed stories with a deceptively light style where the very different characters are all dealing with difficult but survivable situations in a very positive way.

Aliens and Aliens uses a traditional school Christmas presentation  (complete with globalobs) to casually mix multiculturalism, childhood squabbles and jealousies alongside growing excitement as Christmas draws closer. The description is gentle but so skilful. Then the slightly frightening dream leads beautifully to the neat twist which lets the main characters achieve their hearts desire so satisfactorily.

Not without a carrot is a very gentle retelling of the Nativity with the addition of a troublesome but loveable donkey with a liking for carrots. The characterisation is sharp and comfortable as the situation develops into the well-known story. The description is strong but gentle and the illustration helps to develop the gentle feeling where the importance of the carrot is neatly put into perspective.

Bootee for Etta is on a different level. This deals with the most difficult of the situations and does so in a very positive way. A young child suddenly away from family on Christmas Eve is quite a dreadful prospect. Oh no, where is this story going? The description is again wonderful and understated.  The emotion is bouncing from the page in amongst the clear straightforward language which explains the story. As we learn about the characters and the problems they face the little touches of magic and wonder appear and help each one to learn how to deal with the situations that they don’t like. We are kept guessing right to the end, but of course, it’s Christmas so it has to be ok.

Sue Hampton give us three very different stories, each with its own very appealing charm."

Sue Dyer, retired school librarian

 

 

"Aliens and Angels' is a very beautiful and interesting story which deals with issues most children have.

'Not Without a Carrot' is so funny, it's a wonderful take on a very familiar story and from a very different point of view. I'm sure Sunday school teachers and even ministers/pastors will enjoy this as I did.

'Bootee For Etta' is another wonderful Christmas story every child would like to hear or read.

The book is easy to read, beautifully written and I recommend it to children all over. It is sure to be one that will be read over and over again."

Lottie Yinka, ex-minister

 

 

"A charming selection of three stories just like the Three Kings bearing gifts to baby Jesus. These stories are magical with a cheerful tone and will warm the hearts of young readers. Angels and Aliens is a perfect stocking filler for Christmas and adds a new dimension to children's Christmas stories. The character of Trouble the Donkey really gives the donkey who took Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem a firm place as the star of such amazing love, grace, humility and sheer joy of the Yuletide."

Collette Caffrey, Stanza Poetry Group

 

 

About the book

Sue Hampton captures the spirit of Christmas with three warm-hearted stories full of humour, mystery and magic – starring a boy who’d rather be an angel than a globalob, a donkey called Trouble and a girl with a cracker-sized lamb. With illustrations by children from schools Sue has visited, this is a book to make you smile at any time of year.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

09 October 2013: Harry Riley has been featured in the Eastwood Advertiser.

 

Read the Eastwood Advertiser Feature

 

'Sins of the Father' is in The People's Book Prize 2013 AUTUMN Fiction Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

We encourage all our authors and readers to get the books or borrow from their local libraries and cast their votes for these books.

 

The People's Book Prize entry link: Sins of the Father - Fiction Category

 

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

We wish Harry Riley the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

26 September 2013: Another great review of 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury' by Rebecca D. Elswick.

 

The Review
"If you love a good mystery, then what could be better than a 50 year old letter that leads the main character, Julie, on an adventure to find the person who was supposed to receive this love letter? The one thing that Julie discovered from the letter was that it had been written by a soldier returning home after the end of the World War II to a nurse in Cleethorpes. They had met at a rehabilitation hospital in Kent and fell head over heels in love. With her husband in tow, Julie travels to East Coast holiday resort of Cleethorpes. Here they discover much more than who should have received the letter. They discover dark secrets that hark back to the Third Reich. If their discoveries fall into the wrong hands, the very foundation of the British government could be destroyed. "

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

24 September 2013: A snap shot of Ronald Ooms' book signing at Paulushoef at Son DZ, Netherlands.

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

20 September 2013: Novel nomination for author at 73, Harry Riley has been featured in the Nottingham Post.

 

Read the Nottingham Post Feature

 

'Sins of the Father' is in The People's Book Prize 2013 AUTUMN Fiction Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

We encourage all our authors and readers to get the books or borrow from their local libraries and cast their votes for these books.

 

The People's Book Prize entry link: Sins of the Father - Fiction Category

 

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

We wish Harry Riley the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

17 September 2013: A book trailer for 'In all Probability: A collection of short stories'.

 

Cult debut short story collection based on fate, karma, chance encounters and revenge. Considers how the course of life flows after brief encounters. Ideal for quick coffee breaks.

 

Watch Book Trailer

 

 

Steve Morris is the author of 'In All Probability', 'Jumble Tales' and the newly released novel, 'Playing Havoc'.

 

Back to to

 

14 September 2013: Review of 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury' by Jude Ouvrard.

 

The Review
"I enjoyed reading this novel so much because of the author's talent to create the perfect plot. I liked all the twists and different directions he was taking me. Definitely a page turner! I couldn't put it down.

The author has the ability to write description that made me feel like I was part of the story. I could see everything the author wanted me to see, like in a movie. It's well written and the characters all perfectly described.

It's definitely a book that I will read again. It was a good read and the end left me wanting more. I recommend this book to everyone!
Two thumbs up!"

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

12 September 2013: A review of 'The Other Daddy – A World Away' by Harry Riley*, an author and a member of the Eastwood Booktown Development Group.

 

The Review - `The Other Daddy – A World Away' by Claire Louise Voet


"I have to confess the title of this novel did not jump out as something I wanted to read.

I could have walked by in the bookshop without giving it a second glance, thinking it was chick-lit or a female romance story. However, possessing a more than passing interest in anything to do with paranormal activities, I read the blurb on the back cover and became intrigued.

Now having read the book I am glad I did, for I could have missed out on an extremely unusual and gripping tale. Not only that, but the story is filled with mysterious happenings and thought-provoking behaviour by both adults and children.

Without wishing to give too much away, there is a seven year old boy living in Cambridgeshire in 2011, whose parents have drifted apart and he begins to exhibit strange behaviour at home and at school, so much so that his teacher feels the need to consult his mother.

It is thought that his parent’s separation may have been responsible, but as time goes by the boy’s outpourings take on a far more sinister turn and both his mother and father unite to get him psychiatric treatment. This produces no real answers and in desperation they turn to a specialist in parapsychology.

To my mind, it is at this point that the story really takes off and although the chapters and scene-settings jump about alarmingly; from the tragic disappearance of two girls on a remote Scottish island eight years previously; and on to the home town of this disturbed boy. And although the time-scale switches both forwards and back into the past, slowly the threads of this novel are skilfully drawn together, to produce an unpredictable climax.

Being particularly drawn to coincidences and strange happenings in both fact and fiction, which often defy logical explanation. I can say in all honesty, I have rarely read a more absorbing and un-put-down-able novel.."

 

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

10 September 2013: Michael Kindred, author of 'Once Upon a Game' has been featured in the Nottingham Post.

 

Book Summary

Find out about the intriguing, sometimes frustrating, world of games inventing from someone who has spent 55 years exploring it and has had over 50 different games marketed, selling around 3 million in more than 20 countries. There is also a glimpse into the fun and toil of co-writing 20 books. He didn't get rich – it doesn't work like that!

Read the full feature

 

Michael Kindred is the author of Once Upon a Game

 

Back to to

 

09 September 2013: A snap shot of Ronald Ooms' book signing at Fort 2 in Wommelgem Belgium.

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

07 September 2013: A book trailer for 'Whittington Manor' by Claire Voet, is now live.

 

It’s 1939 and the world is full of uncertainty. Sarah Whittington age 16 is the only daughter of Lord and Lady Whittington, she finds her life tedious. She craves excitement. Joe Lambert, a 19 year old land worker, meets Sarah by chance in Portchester. There is chemistry between the pair and an unspoken bond but they must keep their love a secret.

 

Watch Book Trailer

 

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

05 September 2013: Ronald Ooms will be signing copies of his new book, Silver Eagle, at Veldhoven, the Netherlands.

 

Saturday 14 September 2013

Time: To be confirmed

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

We wish Ronald the very best with these event.

 

Back to to

 

04 September 2013: Ronald Ooms will be signing copies of his new book, Silver Eagle, at Paulushoef in Son, Netherlands.

 

Saturday 15 September 2013

Time: 15:00 until 16:00

 

Book signing in Son right next to the 101 A/B DZ.

Paulushoef
Sonniuswijk 42
5691 PE SON

 

At 4 PM the ceremony starts where Paulushoef will be officially declared as a monument.
 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

We wish Ronald the very best with these event.

 

Back to to

 

03 September 2013: 'Sins of the Father' is in The People's Book Prize 2013 AUTUMN Fiction Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

 

We encourage all our authors and readers to get the books or borrow from their local libraries and cast their votes for these books.

 

The People's Book Prize entry link:

Sins of the Father - Fiction Category

 

The public has 3 months to vote for your title: 1 September 2013 – 30 November 2013. The 3 authors with the most votes in the category will become finalists.

 

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

Author

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

We wish Harry Riley the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

02 September 2013: Congratulations! 'The Blake Curse' by I. C. Camilleri is a finalist in 'The People's Book Prize' SUMMER 2013 Fiction Collection.

 

A big thank you to everyone who voted for 'The Blake Curse'.

 

The People's Book Prize entry link: The Blake Curse - Fiction Category

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

I. C. Camilleri is the author of The Blake Curse.

 

Well done I. C. Camilleri, we are proud of you.

 

 

Back to to

 

30 August 2013: An interview on Express FM by Terry Powell - listen to Claire Voet talk about her books - 'The Other Daddy' and 'Whittington Manor'.

Click to listen to the feature audio clip. (OR listen via the player below).

 

 

 

About the books

The Other Daddy: Two teenage girls have mysteriously disappeared from the small Scottish Orkney island of Eday. Eight years later in Cambridgeshire, seven year old Callum is trying to cope with his parents’ separation. He is behaving strangely – talking about his other daddy and a new friend - Jeremy. But who are they? and what is the link between Callum and Eday?

 

Whittington Manor: It’s 1939 and the world is full of uncertainty. Sarah Whittington age 16 is the only daughter of Lord and Lady Whittington, she finds her life tedious. She craves excitement. Joe Lambert, a 19 year old land worker, meets Sarah by chance in Portchester. There is chemistry between the pair and an unspoken bond but they must keep their love a secret.

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

26 August 2013: Joyous Pomp Romp, another review of Pomp and Circumstances by Steve Campen, Radio Producer.

 

The Review

"Love and marriage and what better backdrop than the biggest marriage, so far, this century. Sue really brings the whole day back to life again. Like many I was non-plussed about the Kate and William wedding but really rather enjoyed the whole event, much like this book, filled with teenage angst royal splendour and a touch of genuine love. Does it all end happily ever after? I suggest you read Sue's book to find out."

Review by Steve Campen, Radio Producer

 

About the book

On Royal Wedding Day, James is in no mood for romance after a disastrous date. But somewhere in the crowd celebrating at Hyde Park is a girl from a different background and postcode who could change his world. For five young Londoners, one day will bring panic, grief, conflict and risks worth taking.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and the soon-to-be-released 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

23 August 2013: Ronald Ooms' Silver Eagle has been featured in the Belgian Newspaper Nieuwsblad van Geel.

 

Read the full feature. (Dutch Language)

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

12 August 2013: A candid review of Pomp and Circumstances by Thomasin Sayers, student.

 

The Review

"The royal wedding of Will and Kate centred around romance and celebration; 'Pomp and Circumstances' introduces its own aspects of London life where similar situations occur on a level to which the reader can relate. Events throughout the story touch on the themes of romance, loss and celebration, however they are all brought together through a nationwide sense of joy. These events do, however, create a bigger picture from the events of the Royal Wedding day, and remind the reader that this was not the case for everyone in Britain. It takes us back to consider and remember where we were at the time of the wedding - who we were with and to what extent it was an important event to us. Different views of the wedding are demonstrated through Sue's characters, and without a doubt some will be more similar to the reader than others. There are patriots who enjoy the history of the wedding, those who enjoy the festivities, and those who are not interested at all - capturing a spectrum of society across London. An atmosphere is captured within this short book so well that you can keep it as a souvenir, even if you didn't experience the royal wedding festivities yourself. Perhaps a sequel should be written following the events of the royal baby! "

Review by Thomasin Sayers, student

 

About the book

On Royal Wedding Day, James is in no mood for romance after a disastrous date. But somewhere in the crowd celebrating at Hyde Park is a girl from a different background and postcode who could change his world. For five young Londoners, one day will bring panic, grief, conflict and risks worth taking.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and the soon-to-be-released 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

10 August 2013: Michael Kindred has been featured in the Mansfield and Ashfield Chad Newspaper.

 

A Games Inventor Shares His Rise To Success With The Release Of A Book

Read the full feature

 

Michael Kindred is the author of Once Upon a Game

 

Back to to

 

08 August 2013: The Derby Telegraph invites readers to submit short stories. Here is a piece by Neal James, titled 'Out of the Frying Pan'

 

Philip Neale's short story set in the World Trade Center - Short Excerpt

"Trader Mark Carston knew he was in trouble as soon as he was summoned to his company's head office in New York's World Trade Center."

 

© Article and image source - Derby Telegraph

 

MARK knew that he was for the high jump as soon as he got the summons to head office from Burt Travers, the head of corporate HR. He had failed on a number of potentially lucrative contracts and the work required to seal each deal had been neither complicated nor time-consuming.

Now it was time to face the music and, as he sat in the company's reception area of the 38th floor of the World Trade Center in New York, he started to worry about how he was going to explain things to his wife Selma. They had been married for 22 years and, although they had no children, his was the only source of income and they had a hefty mortgage to pay on their Philadelphia home. It was a riverfront property off St Columbus Boulevard and he had gambled on his commission to pay off the interest on the loan. He was snapped out of his reverie by a call over the reception intercom.

"Doreen, send Mr Carston in please."

She waved Mark down the corridor to room 3810.

Travers was standing facing the window, looking out across the New York skyline. He told Mark to take a seat in that blunt, dead, no-nonsense voice which Mark had heard on a number of occasions when the man had visited the mid-west offices in Philadelphia. He turned around and stubbed out his cigar in a large ornate marble ashtray, went to the door and asked his secretary to bring in a cup of coffee, and leaving it open took a deep breath, shook his head and sat down.

"Carston, normally in circumstances like this I would have the cops standing in the corner ready to take you away after what we've found out about your activities, but it's your lucky day – with the merger coming up we don't want any jitters affecting the stock price now that we've almost got pen put to paper."

Click link to read full story...

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

07 August 2013: An audio review of 'The Other Daddy' by Graham Sclater, author and script writer on Venture Radio.

The interview has been widely circulated to over 60 radio stations in the UK and Europe.

Click to listen to the feature audio clip. (OR listen via the player below).

 

 

 

About the book

Two teenage girls have mysteriously disappeared from the small Scottish Orkney island of Eday. Eight years later in Cambridgeshire, seven year old Callum is trying to cope with his parents’ separation. He is behaving strangely – talking about his other daddy and a new friend - Jeremy. But who are they? and what is the link between Callum and Eday?

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

03 August 2013: Author Spotlight - Chris Pownall on Morgen Bailey Writing Blog

 

Author Chris R. Pownall, who now resides in Nottinghamshire England, was born in 1943 in the rural Cheshire village of Bosley. He has an older sister Cynthia Edwards, who also has ambition to become a published author.

Their parents, Robert and Lucy Pownall were hard working and caring individuals, whose standards and values were, rooted in the future lives of their two children. Sadly Robert died prematurely, leaving Lucy to complete the parenting of Cynthia and Chris who were 17 & 9 years of age respectively, at the time of his death.

Chris failed his 11+ examination and received a secondary modern school education, leaving full time education at 15 years of age, with no academic qualifications to his name. He managed to secure an engineering apprenticeship at a nearby mill and attended Macclesfield College of further education, studying mechanical engineering until the age of 22 years.

Upon completion of his education and apprenticeship, Chris was promoted to the drawing office, but after 18 months in this responsible job, he decided it was time to move on.

In 1967, he joined the Merchant Navy, serving with the famous Blue Funnel Line, as an Assistant Engineering Officer. Whilst this was exciting and adventurous, Chris decided a life at sea was not for him, so following his initial training and one voyage to the Far East, he called it a day....

Read the feature

 

Chris Pownall is the author of Dane Mills Bosley, and the following three books: 'Funny How Things Work Out', 'Onwards and Upwards' and 'A Long Journey Back'

 

Back to to

 

02 August 2013: Once Upon a Game: an extract from Derrick Knight's Ramblings Blog.

 

Today I finished reading my friend Michael Kindred’s autobiographical work, ‘Once Upon a Game’, being a description of his ‘precarious career as a games inventor’.  For two reasons I am mightily relieved that I can wholeheartedly recommend this entertaining book.  The first is because Michael is a very good long-standing friend and, in the world of cryptic crosswords, colleague.  The second is that I feature as one of his collaborators.

Michael’s capacity to entertain is at least twofold in this piece.  The first strand of this talent is in his descriptions of the process of creativity from the, sometimes failing, germ of an idea to the shop shelves.  I found his story of how the very successful board game ‘Bewitched’ came into being fascinating and provoking of much admiration.  Without giving too much away I can record that his observation of a discarded but saved ‘just in case’ magnet from a kitchen cupboard door mechanism, led to an idea for the game that produced a surprise element that immediately captivated the minds of the Waddington assessors.

For those who are intrigued by the actual mechanics of the games; how these developed; the intricacies of the processes of playing; and the rules, there is a different kind of entertainment.  I have to confess that my brain doesn’t easily grasp such concepts, so I did skip some sections.  If you have a mind like Maggie and Mike’s rather brilliant daughter Cathy, I can assure you that you will be too gripped to skip anything.  Super-intelligence is not however necessary for enjoyment of these sections, for Michael does have the ability to make them simple, which benefitted the children at the Southwell primary school where he played a once-weekly play-testing session.  I am sure the visits of Mr. Kindred were most popular.  The expertise in working with groups, of both Michael and his wife Maggie, was put to good use in the production of the very popular ‘Once Upon a Group’, the first book to come out of the 4M stable.

Just as our work on cryptic crosswords and related books involved Michael and me bouncing ideas off each other, so the games creation involved a similar relationship with the late Malcolm Goldsmith.  My friend and I shared much fun, as did he with Malcolm.

The light-hearted nature of this professional autobiography does not conceal the nerve-wracking aspects of the author’s chosen career.  Creativity is an intensely personal process which, as he says, needs the reinforcement of appreciation and acceptance by others.  To persevere in the face of the inevitable disappointments requires great courage and resilience. The need to make a living from the products, and their likely short-lived nature, puts timescales on the work which create considerable pressure.  The inventor can never rest on his laurels.  New ideas must always be forthcoming.  The classics such as Scrabble and Monopoly were produced in a different era.  I don’t know about Monopoly, but Scrabble was developed as a family game having the benefit of many years’ play-testing before it reached the public.  As Michael states, the support of a good wife is also rather helpful.  A daughter who loves games is equally a considerable asset.

 

Michael Kindred is the author of Once Upon a Game

 

Back to to

 

01 August 2013: A review of Pomp and Circumstances by Hazel Ward (Former school teacher).

 

The Review

"I so enjoyed the way Sue Hampton sets the young lives of James, his sister Faith, Olly and Hema against the pomp of William and Kate’s royal wedding. The circumstances they find themselves in and the decisions they take on this day shape and drive the novel. They have to deal with loss, take responsibility, dare to be different, take control, and try new boy/girl relationships. All the characters live in their own right, yet gently weave different cultures, class and gender together. Even their parents are vivid and the adult world full of humour. This is definitely a book young people in their teens will find very rewarding – even those well out of their teens!"

Review by Hazel Ward (Former school teacher)

 

About the book

On Royal Wedding Day, James is in no mood for romance after a disastrous date. But somewhere in the crowd celebrating at Hyde Park is a girl from a different background and postcode who could change his world. For five young Londoners, one day will bring panic, grief, conflict and risks worth taking.

 

Sue Hampton is the author of 'Pomp and Circumstances' and the soon-to-be-released 'Aliens and Angels: Three Stories For Christmas'

 

Back to to

 

30 July 2013: Mirror Mirror - a short story by author Neal James*, featured on Amber Valley Info Website.

Mirror Mirror is spread over seven chapters and an excerpt from the seventh chapter is published below.

Mirror Mirror

“Mummy! Mummy look at this. Dad says I can’t possibly wear anything so hideous tonight. You said it would be alright didn’t you?”

Melanie came racing down the stairs and into the lounge, her face red with indignation. Pauline looked slowly around the room and stood in complete silence as she came to terms with events of the past few moments. They had all reeled as the heavy glass object crashed into the far side of the mirror, and she had stepped forwards as the figure of Melanie disappeared backwards in the foggy air generated by the explosion of fragments into the Colmores’ lounge. She reached out automatically but the hand of Maria prevented any further movement and the entire scene vanished before her eyes.

Now she was standing in the lounge of her own home all those years ago with her twelve year old daughter before her with arms folded and shoulders hunched in an all too familiar pose. Derek took great delight in winding Melanie up at the drop of a hat, and in this instance it was clearly something to do with the clothes which she proposed to wear after coming back from her friend’s house where she had stayed the night.

“Mummy? Mummy, you alright?”...

 

Click link to read full story here...

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

29 July 2013: A candid review of Claire Voet's 'The Other Daddy – A World Away' by Simon Hugh Wheeler, author of Loosely Translated.

 

An Imaginary Daddy - or Something More Sinister?

"The mystery surrounding the disappearance of two girls is anything but normal... more paranormal. A man's life becomes a nightmare after his daughter and her friend go missing. Murder is unheard of on the tiny Scottish island and the suspicion is directed towards the father. But if he didn't kill them, how could they simply go missing on such a small island?

Seven years later, in England, a young boy is having problems - but are they just a reaction to his parents' recent separation? Everybody puts it down to childish behaviour... until it becomes much more disturbing.

A refreshingly original idea. The back and forth between the past and present, Scotland and England, maintains the rhythm and tension. I especially liked the character of Angus, the father of one of the missing girls: his anguish at losing a daughter, the anger at the accusations of the islanders, and the frustration at the inability of the police to come up with anything. His descent into squalor is heart-breaking, compounded by the earlier death of his wife. The young boy, Callum, is also interesting, with his frustration at getting people to stop ignoring his problems and take them seriously.

Great to read something different. Well recommended."

Simon Hugh Wheeler, author of Loosely Translated

 

About the book

Two teenage girls have mysteriously disappeared from the small Scottish Orkney island of Eday. Eight years later in Cambridgeshire, seven year old Callum is trying to cope with his parents’ separation. He is behaving strangely – talking about his other daddy and a new friend - Jeremy. But who are they? and what is the link between Callum and Eday?

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

08 July 2013: Adrian L. Youseman's Dudgeon's Bridge has been featured in the Kent Messenger.

English soil, so treasured, hasn’t always been a green and pleasant land.

The times when life was cheap and governments were proved with butchery and bloodshed, are, in reality, only a few hundred years behind us. The history we take for granted is littered with the prejudices of originating scholars and the editing of the victors from any given age.

The 17th century Civil War split families and towns, killing by proportion more English men than WW1 and WW2 combined. History has polished its account to let us believe that somehow it was the birth of our democratic nation, but this was no rite.

Dudgeon’s Bridge takes you through these times. A boy is born into a town beset by the worst of these troubles and must struggle to make his mark, whilst trying to look after his family. We know too well in today’s world that one simple life can change the world we know, but little of those in the past who did. This is the account that’s waiting to be told, for the monstrosity of war creates its children and just like so many of them, the truth is so often the first to be orphaned.

Read the Kent Messenger feature

 

Adrian L. Youseman is the author of Dudgeon's Bridge

 

Back to to

 

06 July 2013: I. C. Camilleri has been featured in The Malta Sunday Times.

 'The Blake Curse' I. C. Camilleri is in The People's Book Prize 2013 SUMMER Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

 

Read the Malta Sunday Times feature

 

The People's Book Prize entry link:

The Blake Curse - Fiction Category

 

I. C. Camilleri is the author of The Blake Curse.

 

Back to to

 

04 July 2013: Neal James has been featured on the Voices & Verbs Blog.

 

I’m a Derbyshire author, am 61 this year, and have been writing since 2006 when an idea for a family ‘saga’ was triggered by the death of my wife’s father.

33 years of earning a living in a professional capacity as an accountant provided the kind of discipline needed to complete novels ranging from 65,000 to 100,000 words. Putting myself through a professional qualification made me realise that there really is no such thing as a Free Lunch, and that the only person likely to take an interest in my career, apart from my wife Lynn, was me.

This is the sort of reality which had stood me in good stead, and allowed me to reconcile to the fact that agencies simply are not interested in unknown, and therefore high risk, authors. I was extremely fortunate to find Pneuma Springs – a publisher prepared to take a risk without the fallback position of relying on an agent to screen the work.

I began writing in earnest with short stories on a couple of US writing sites. The short story genre continues as the ideas crop up, and two of them have made the transition into full-length novels already. The change came in 2008, when ‘A Ticket to Tewkesbury’ (a short story of some 3,500 words) evolved into the 65,000 words novel which Pneuma Springs published in that year. I never try to force a story, and always go where the plot leads. This is what happened with ‘Ticket’, and it was a case of playing ‘catch-up’ as the ideas ran ahead of me. The second was ‘The Rings of Darelius, a sci-fi novel in 85,000 words which is scheduled for 2015.

Follow the link to read full feature

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

03 July 2013: A snap shot of Ronald Ooms' book signing at Angoville-au-Plain in France.

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

01 July 2013b: An excellent review of Claire Voet's 'The Other Daddy – A World Away' by Pat Jay Heart Fm Spain Radio.

 

"I have just finished reading your book The Other Daddy – A World Away and I wanted to tell you how FANTASTIC it is.

You are such a brilliant writer that it takes my breath away. I love the way more than one story is going on at the same time, much like you would watch a film, and in real life too. The characters are so real, I can see each one of them, and the scenes - the way you leave things to peoples’ imaginations, is fantastic.

You give just enough detail to allow the imagination to wonder and make a picture. You are an amazingly, talented and naturally gifted writer. This is the second book of yours I have read, and I have thoroughly enjoyed both of them, they are certainly in my top 10 of books I have read over the years.

Long may your writing career last, and it’s about time someone picked up on you and gave you the recognition you deserve. This one, like the last one, will make an excellent film.

I thank you for allowing me to be the first reader and I would be honoured to write the first review on Amazon when the time is right. You may use this review if you wish."

Pat Jay Heart Fm Spain Radio

 

About the book

Two teenage girls have mysteriously disappeared from the small Scottish Orkney island of Eday. Eight years later in Cambridgeshire, seven year old Callum is trying to cope with his parents’ separation. He is behaving strangely – talking about his other daddy and a new friend - Jeremy. But who are they? and what is the link between Callum and Eday?

 

Claire Voet is the author of 'Whittington Manor' and 'The Other Daddy - A World Away'.

 

Back to to

 

01 July 2013a: Once Upon a Game: snap shots of a talk at Southwell Library by Michael Kindred

"...The main reason for writing the book was that during my 55 years of games inventing, a lot of people had asked me all sorts of questions about this seemingly bizarre and precarious pursuit. ...An aspect of creativity which I used the most was to ask 'What if...?' When our daughter was little she must have thought 'What if I open my bean bag to see what's inside?' Unbeknown to us, this intriguing scientific experiment took place at the top of our stairs! The word cascade comes to mind! I have had many similar experiences during my career – failure and creativity are inextricably linked..."

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Kindred is the author of Once Upon a Game

 

Back to to

 

18 June 2013: Read all about it - The Falconer Style.

 

Style is often a matter of taste. I daresay that the Falconer style, for reasons that are beyond me, is not to everyone’s taste, but at least his writing:

  • is clear and unambiguous

  • is grammatically, syntactically and orthographically correct in every detail

  • has (I like to think) a certain elegance

  • evinces an old-world charm too often lacking in today’s writing

  • springs no surprises (no sex, profanities or violence)

  • in short, provides good, wholesome, family entertainment!

Some classic crime novelists – naming no names, but, just for the sake of argument, might I, without incurring charges of patronisation and to give the reader an idea of what I have in mind, instance Agatha Christie, Ellis Peters and Margaret Yorke? – have failed to evolve their own style: they tell a good story, but the English is undistinguished. Their books are entertaining but not, in my submission, literature. (There is, of course, more to literature than the use of language, but surely literature must at least include a good use of language?) Some crime novels, like those of Peter Cheyney and Raymond Chandler, are racy and fast-paced; others, like Eco’s The Name of the Rose, heavier and more discursive. Some – might one instance Reginald Hill, Ian Rankin and Camilleri? - aim at realism, others (Ngaio Marsh, Tey, Brett) at a cosier, less harsh atmosphere.

Some, returning to past ages, like Anne Perry, Peter Lovesey and Derek Wilson, try to reproduce the police methods, the language and the background of a historical period. Some, like Michael Innis, Ronald Knox and R. Austin Freeman, make a point of using words well. Where, in all this variety, does Falconer stand? Let us instance some features of his style, as I understand them:

  • a wide and varied vocabulary

  • a deliberate effort to overcome, with the judicious use of clauses, any tendency to parataxis

  • careful punctuation, marking off phrases and clauses so that the eye is quickly guided through the text

  • an effort to use words effectively, allowing each one its proper weight and giving each one a context in which its meaning is properly reflected

  • an effort to create sentences which are well-balanced, both within themselves and with each other

  • observance of traditional grammar and syntax in an effort to reflect accepted and reputable English usage as resorted to by the best authors. Authors he admires include Scott, Dickens, Graham Greene, H. E. Bates, John Moore, Charles Morgan, C. P. Snow,
    Galsworthy, Anthony Powell ... all of a past age!

  • a balance among direct speech, indirect speech and narrative, to provide variety.

What he is not necessarily very good at is giving characters individual voices. Also, he does not find it easy to reproduce local dialects, even though he can hear the characters speaking in his head. Furthermore, some readers might find his writing austere, pernickety or over-serious. I beg them to persevere!

Take the following passage. Its provenance is immaterial, but let us say, for the sake of this exercise, Simon Brett’s The Poisoning in the Pub (2009), chapter 13:
He just didn’t look right, though, sitting in a Fethering Beach café, whose frontage opened on to the shingle and where hordes of holidaymakers queued up for tea, burgers and ice cream. Amid all the tanned and sunburnt skin on display, Ted Crisp had a prisoner’s pallor. But then he never did go outside the pub much. Whether entirely true or not, it was his proud boast that he’d never before set foot on Fethering Beach. And it was only twenty yards from the front of the Crown and Anchor.

If Falconer had been writing this paragraph, he might have preferred to present it thus:
He just did not look right, however, sitting in a Fethering Beach café, the frontage of which opened on to the shingle and in which hordes of holidaymakers queued up for tea, burgers and ice-cream. Amid all the tanned and sunburnt skin on display, Ted Crisp had a prisoner’s pallor - but then he never did go outside the pub much. Whether entirely true or not, it was his proud boast that he had never before set foot on Fethering Beach - which was only twenty yards from the front of the Crown & Anchor.

The changes are small, but the overall effect, while subtle, is unmistakeable. Which does the reader prefer? It is a question not of what is right as opposed to what is wrong but of the ‘feel’ or atmosphere that the two writers wish to create. Brett is matey and comfortable, where Falconer is formal, more ‘literary’, clearly keen to distinguish dialogue from narrative.

However, although the discussion could continue for a long time, perhaps enough has been said in the present forum. I hope the reader is convinced that at least Mr Falconer is concerned about style – concerned to provide those who take up his books with a GOOD READ.

 

(Chronological order of Julius Falconer Series)

1 - The Spider's Banquet

2 - A Death Twice Twice Avenged

3 - The Longdon Murders

4 - The Unexpected Death of Father Wilfred

5 - Mr Carrick is Laid To Rest

6 - The Bones of Murder

7 - A Time to Prey

8 - Troubled Waters

9 - Tempt Not the Stars

10 - Jagger

11 - The Wichenford Court Murder

12 A Figure in the Mist

13 - The Waif

14 - The Alkan Murder

15 - A Fearful Madness

16 - Over and Doubt

 

Julius Falconer completed six enjoyable years of university studies abroad (particularly slow, our Julius) before working as a translator back in the UK. Thinking that he could earn more as a teacher, to fund his lavish life-style, he took a PGCE at Leeds University and duly turned to teaching. He slaved away at the chalk-face for twenty-six long years in both Cornwall and Scotland before retiring to grow cabbages in Yorkshire, where he still lives. His wife of thirty-three years unfortunately died suddenly in 2000. He has one daughter, married. In 2009, looking to fill his new-found leisure profitably(?), he started to write detective novels and is still happily scribbling away seventeen books later. His interests include music, reading, walking, gardening and genealogy.

Julius Falconer is a member of the Crime Writers’ Association.

 

 

 

Back to to

 

17 June 2013: A candid review of Falconer's 'A Fearful Madness' by Margaret, BooksPlease blog.

 

Review - ‘A Fearful Madness’

Julius Falconer uses language in a more formal way than many other modern authors. His sentences are carefully punctuated, his vocabulary is extensive (meaning there are some words I had to check in the dictionary – and one or two weren’t in my dictionary) and he uses many literary references and illusions. I like his style of writing, although in parts it does tend to be long-winded.

It’s a complex book, following each of the three investigations – some of which seem highly unlikely, but then they do say that truth is stranger than fiction.Two people had been suspected of murdering James Thwaites, the verger, but the police were unable to produce any evidence and the cases against them were dropped. It appeared he had been stealing rare and valuable books from the cathedral and selling them on the black market. I was intrigued by the book-trafficking business which on the one hand was highly organised involving the use of white van drivers, and on the other seemed remarkably lax!

A bearded man was seen outside Thwaites’s house on the evening of the murder and Matthias Biddulph, one of the original suspects, who had been in a relationship with Thwaites hires a private investigator to find him. Another possible motive for the murder is Thwaites’s involvement with an eccentric version of Christianity – the Anti-Church of Jesus Christ, set up in opposition to the Anglican Church, which his sister Serenity investigates.

For the most part, I rather enjoyed reading A Fearful Madness, although I had little idea how it would end – the verger’s will is of significance, but that only features towards the end of the book (unless I missed an earlier reference). I think this is possibly the weakest part of the book when the culprit confesses to the murder. Having said that, I liked it well enough to read more of Falconer’s books and have downloaded Jagger onto my Kindle.

Read the review at BooksPlease

 

(Chronological order of Julius Falconer Series)

1 - The Spider's Banquet

2 - A Death Twice Twice Avenged

3 - The Longdon Murders

4 - The Unexpected Death of Father Wilfred

5 - Mr Carrick is Laid To Rest

6 - The Bones of Murder

7 - A Time to Prey

8 - Troubled Waters

9 - Tempt Not the Stars

10 - Jagger

11 - The Wichenford Court Murder

12 A Figure in the Mist

13 - The Waif

14 - The Alkan Murder

15 - A Fearful Madness

16 - Over and Doubt

 

Julius Falconer completed six enjoyable years of university studies abroad (particularly slow, our Julius) before working as a translator back in the UK. Thinking that he could earn more as a teacher, to fund his lavish life-style, he took a PGCE at Leeds University and duly turned to teaching. He slaved away at the chalk-face for twenty-six long years in both Cornwall and Scotland before retiring to grow cabbages in Yorkshire, where he still lives. His wife of thirty-three years unfortunately died suddenly in 2000. He has one daughter, married. In 2009, looking to fill his new-found leisure profitably(?), he started to write detective novels and is still happily scribbling away seventeen books later. His interests include music, reading, walking, gardening and genealogy.

Julius Falconer is a member of the Crime Writers’ Association.

 

 

 

Back to to

 

15 June 2013: A review of John White's ‘Be Seated' by Harry Riley*, an author and a member of the Eastwood Booktown Development Group.

 

The Review - `Be Seated' by John White


Short stories for the smallest room

"John White could easily have called this imaginative digest: The Cherrypickers Delight; because unlike a novel where the reader is obliged to follow each consecutive chapter in order to follow the plot, here it is a pleasure to dip in and out of each little tale or monologue as the mood suits. Whatever your taste you should find this book a welcome companion.
Several of the stories such as: Gladius and Over The Hills And Far Away are so intriguing they could each be the start of a novel in its own right.
My only criticism, if there is one, is that the book was read, cover-to-cover in too few sittings."

 

*Harry Riley is based in Nottingham England, and writes novels, short stories, poetry and blogs. Retired from commercial printing, he rose from apprentice to director. He is married with two grown children. Harry is the author of three books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

John White is the author of Brook Breasting and Be Seated - Short Stories For The Smallest Room

 

 

Back to to

 

07 June 2013a: 'Funny How Things Work Out' by Chris Pownall featured in the Shipping Today & Yesterday Magazine July 2013

 

Read the feature

 

Chris Pownall is the author of Dane Mills Bosley, and the following three books: 'Funny How Things Work Out', 'Onwards and Upwards' and 'A Long Journey Back'

 

Back to to

 

07 June 2013: Congratulations! 'Whittington Manor' by Claire Louise Voet was 3rd runner-up in 'The People's Book Prize' Spring 2013 Collection.

 

A big thank you to everyone who voted for 'Whittington Manor'.

 

TPBP Link for 'Whittington Manor'

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

Claire Voet is the author of Whittington Manor. Claire's latest book - 'The Other Daddy - A World Away' is due out in Summer 2013.

 

Well done Claire Voet, we are proud of you.

 

Back to to

 

05 June 2013: Mirror Mirror - a short story by author Neal James*, featured on Amber Valley Info Website.

Mirror Mirror is spread over seven chapters and the first chapter is published below with a new chapter released every Friday.

Mirror Mirror
Pauline stood transfixed. The mirror was just what she had been looking for and now, as if by some divine intervention there it was, ready, available and apparently ignored by everyone else. She turned the price ticket over in her fingers and let out an almost inaudible gasp of surprise - £75. The stallholder came over to her after serving another customer and asked if he could help.

“No thank you, I was just looking. It is a nice mirror though.”

“Belonged to my grandmother. She died recently and we’re clearing out her stuff. These car boot sales really are a Godsend.”

Pauline nodded and smiled; vendors at sales would tell any story to offload unwanted belongings, and this one certainly seemed to fit the bill. Nevertheless she hurried off as calmly as possible to find her husband, Derek. The mirror was simply too good a bargain to miss and the move to their new home needed some finishing touches. She found him rummaging through a pile of books at a nearby stall and tugged his arm in her excitement, causing a shower of literature on to the grass.

“Pauline! Watch what you’re doing.” He turned to his wife and the look on her face transformed his annoyance.

They had been married for over twenty years and he had never yet been able to maintain any kind of air of irritation with her when she smiled at him in that way. Picking up the paperbacks she had scattered on the ground, he handed over the money to a grinning old man and followed the lengthening sleeve of his jumper as Pauline marched off with it across the field.

She stopped some way short of the stall and pointed. The mirror was still there, unsold, unwanted and shining beautifully in the sunlight as it sent its seductive message to them both. Derek had to admit it looked a real beauty and would fit in very well above the marble fireplace in their new home...

 

Click link to read full story here...

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

Back to to

 

03 June 2013: Neal James was interviewed by Richard Godwin, Chin Wags At The Slaughterhouse Blog.

 

Interview Excerpt

Q. Does being an accountant influence your attention to detail or other matters in your fictions?

A. It certainly imposes a discipline in terms of the structure of what I write.

Each author will select the most suitable method of controlling a plot, and it has to be something with which they are comfortable. For me, as an accountant, it is the Spreadsheet.

Spreadsheets are one of the mainstay tools of my profession, and are perfectly adaptable for the purposes of writing literary fiction. I can set out the structure of each novel in standard form and then bend and adapt it to match the needs of each book.

Along with a plot layout in MS Word, I can then keep a tight control over characters, story lines, and logic. By this means, I can ensure that there are no loose ends… unless I make a conscious decision to leave them lying around for purposes of my own.

The accountancy profession also provides me with a wealth of data for my writing. This was something that I used throughout my 2011 novel ‘Threads of Deceit’ – a crime story set against the backdrop of the textile industry, and a story based on financial mismanagement, embezzlement and fraud. My 18 years in that industry also gave me more than a superficial insight into the trade, and this is another device which I use to give plots a firm grounding in a sense of ‘fact’.

 

Q. Is there a particular event or experience that has changed your life and influenced your writing?

A. My father-in-law died in 2001, and I suppose that could be seen as the event which started the ball rolling.

As a family, we tend to celebrate a life rather than mourn a death, and during the years following his passing there were occasions when we would reminisce and recall events which made us laugh. My mother-in-Law’s reaction to all of this was ‘You could write a book about that’, and the more I thought about it, the more I became convinced that I could. All that remained was a title.

Again, she came up trumps with another of her stock sayings, ‘talk about laugh’, and that is what the manuscript was entitled. As a personal record of family life it is unlikely to be published, but the 75,000 words did set me on the trail of the writing which culminated this year in the release of my fifth book.

 

Q. Who are your literary influences?

A. It depends on which genre I’m writing at the time.

The four novels to date have all been crime-related, and my main influences have been James Patterson and his Alex Cross novels, and Jeffery Deaver with his particular style of short story writing. They both lead the reader deeper into the story by using short, punchy chapters, which compel ‘just one more page’. This is something which I have tried to emulate.

I am intending to branch out into other styles, and 2015 should see the release of my first attempt at science fiction. ‘The Rings of Darelius’ is a four-part saga, and is heavily influenced by Isaac Asimov and Gene Roddenberry.

2016 will see the completion of the first draft of ‘Dreamer’, a paranormal mystery set in the kind of style which you would expect from James Herbert, who is one of my favourite horror writers.

 

Follow the link to read full interview.

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

01 June 2013: 'The Wishing Book', 'The Blake Curse' and 'Jack the Ripper' are in The People's Book Prize 2013 SUMMER Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

 

We encourage all our authors and readers to get the books or borrow from their local libraries and cast their votes for these books.

 

The People's Book Prize entry links:

The Wishing Book - Children/YA Category

The Blake Curse - Fiction Category

Jack the Ripper - Non-fiction Category

 

The public has 3 months to vote for your title: 1st June 2013 – 31st August 2013. The 3 authors with the most votes in the category will become finalists.

 

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

Authors

Grahame Howard is the author of the following four books: The Wishing Book 1, The Wishing Book 2 - Return To Mars, The Wishing Book 3 - Extermination and All Bagged Up

I. C. Camilleri is the author of The Blake Curse.

Peter Hodgson is the author of two books: 'Critical Murder' and 'Jack the Ripper - Through the Mists of Time'

 

We wish Grahame, Isabella and Peter the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

27 May 2013: Ronald Ooms' Silver Eagle has been featured in the Southern Maryland Newspaper.

 

Excerpt from feature:

 

St. Mary’s man’s stories fly on in ‘Silver Eagle’ biography

Biography recalls service of D-Day paratrooper who later lived in St. Mary’s

 

Stories like those of World War II veteran Clancy Lyall should never be lost, according to author Ronald Ooms, who recently published a book about the former “Band of Brothers” soldier.

Lyall, who died last year, was known for his lifetime of service, which began as a teenager when he lied about his age to enter the military and parachuted into combat in World War II.

He was post commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars 2632 in California and a champion of Veterans Day observances in St. Mary’s County.

He spearheaded an annual Veterans Day parade that went through Lexington Park in the 1970s, before it moved in 1993 to Leonardtown.

Lyall helped in the creation of a U.S. Colored Troops memorial in Lexington Park, which was unveiled last year. While the book does not cover his time after the war, including his love of sharing his stories with children, it presents his recollections of an era now long ago.

The book, “Silver Eagle,” is written as if it were a first-person narrative from Lyall and recounts many of his wartime stories, along with a chapter about his early years. Ooms, who lives in Belgium, said the way he produced the book was he would write a chapter, send it to Lyall for his edits and then make the changes.

Lyall’s widow, Isabel, said she enjoyed reading the book.

“I thought it was like talking to my husband, like he was sitting across the room in his easy chair,” she said.

Isabel Lyall said her husband led an interesting life and had lots to tell. “It’s like hearing the stories all over again,” she said.

Their son, Arthur Lyall, said the writings sounded so much like his father that at points it was tear-jerking. There were a few wartime stories that he had not previously heard from his father.

“It was a great book,” he said.

Read the full feature.

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

25 May 2013: Harry Riley's latest book, 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine' promoted by celebrity, singer-songwriter and Patron of Eastwood Booktown, Jackie Trent.

 

 

Eastwood Booktown Development Group was created to improve tourism in Eastwood and the Midlands, thorough the awareness of literacy, culture and the arts, particularly amongst deprived youngsters.

 

We commend the Eastwood Booktown Project initiative and wish the Eastwood Booktown Development Group every success.

Pneuma Springs is passionate about books and the authors who write them.

 

Harry Riley is the author of two books: ‘Captain Damnation and other strange tales’, ‘Sins of the Father’ and 'The Laird of Castle Ballantine'

 

 

Back to top

 

24 May 2013: 'Training and supporting the care force' by Maggie Kindred has been reviewed in the Finch Manor LINK Summer 2013, a magazine about News and Views from Finch Manor Nursing Home.

 

 

Maggie Kindred is the author of 'A Grief Unobserved' and 'Training and supporting the care force'

 

 

Back to to

 

23 May 2013: Neal James has been featured the Daily Mirror.

 

 

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds', 'Threads of Deceit' and his latest book - Full Marks.

 

 

Back to to

 

21 May 2013: Congratulations! 'Whittington Manor' by Claire Louise Voet is a finalist in 'The People's Book Prize' Spring 2013 Collection.

 

A big thank you to everyone who voted for 'Whittington Manor'.

 

The finalists will compete again. Further voting will take place between 21st to 29th May 2013 when the public will be asked to vote again for the 12 finalists in each category to determine the winner of that category’s People’s Book Prize 2012/13. The winners will then be announced at the 4th Award Ceremony on 29th May 2013.

 

Cast your vote for 'Whittington Manor'

TPBP Link for 'Whittington Manor'

 

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

Claire Voet is the author of Whittington Manor. Claire's latest book - 'The Other Daddy - A World Away' is due out in Summer 2013.

 

We wish Claire Voet the very best with this competition.

 

Back to to

 

20 May 2013: Ronald Ooms will be signing copies of his new book, Silver Eagle, at Angoville-au-Plain in France and Historical War Wheels in Belgium. See details.

 

Saturday 8 June 2013

Time: 9am - 12 noon.

Book signing at Angoville-au-Plain, Normandy, France

 

Saturday 3 August 2013

Time: 10am start till 4pm.

Book signing at Historical War Wheels, Fort 2, Wommelgem, Belgium

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

We wish Ronald the very best with these events.

 

Back to to

 

17 May 2013: A candid review of Derek Smith's Wild Strawberries.

 

"I was lent this book by a friend, and was a little concerned as to whether I would enjoy it. It is not my usual type of book. I mostly read crime/murder mysteries. But I was drawn to this book because of it's location. It is set in part of South Staffordshire that I know very well. It tells the true story of the experience of a 9 year old boy who is evacuated from Birmingham during the second world war to the countryside. I was amazed by the courage of the little boy, even when facing adversity, and stuck in a terrible hospital/nursing home for a long time, he never lost his positive spirit, I can definitely say that I would not have coped so well in such miserable circumstances. This boy came from a modern home in the city of Birmingham to live in a very primitive house in the countryside in totally different surroundings. Yet right from the start he is determined to become an expert in the country and to make the best of his situation. I particularly enjoyed the first half of the book. This is the time before he is taken away to hospital when he is roaming around the countryside having just the sort of adventures that I did as a young child. And knowing the area as well as I do, I was able to follow his adventures exactly, knowing precisely which field or lane he was exploring. I felt so sorry for this book and the author, as it is currently sitting without a review, and as I enjoyed it so much I thought that I would leave a positive review, as the author (and evacuee) really deserve it."

Amazon Link to Review

About the book:

This is the true story of a nine year old boy who, at the height of the Birmingham blitz, is transported from his ‘all mod cons’ big city home to the safety of a house in a remote south Staffordshire hamlet, a mile and a half from nowhere, where he finds himself living in domestic and sanitary conditions that have remained unaltered for over a thousand years – the culture shock to end all culture shocks.

 

Derek Smith is the author of two books: 'No Cousin of Mine' and 'Wild Strawberries'

 

Back to top

 

26 April 13: A book trailer for 'The Other Daddy – A World Away' by Claire Voet, is now live.

 

Two teenage girls have mysteriously disappeared from the small Scottish Orkney island of Eday. Eight years later in Cambridgeshire, seven year old Callum is trying to cope with his parents’ separation. He is behaving strangely – talking about his other daddy and a new friend - Jeremy. But who are they? and what is the link between Callum and Eday?

 

Watch Book Trailer

 

 

Claire Voet is the author of Whittington Manor. Claire's latest book - 'The Other Daddy - A World Away' is due out in Summer 2013.

 

Back to to

 

25 April 2013: Ronald Ooms will be signing copies of his new book, Silver Eagle, at Kamp 1944 in Belgium and Centre Historique des Parachutistes du Jour-J in France. See details.

 

Saturday 4 May 2013

Time: 10 AM start, all day.

Book signing at Kamp 1944, Putte in Belgium. Kamp 1944 is a reconstruction of an allied WWII camp; with anti-aircraft battery, various materials , weapons and many vehicles and equipment.

 

Saturday 8 June 2013

Time: 2 PM to 5 PM

Book signing at the Centre Historique des Parachutistes du Jour-J, Dead Man's Corner, Saint Côme du Mont in France.

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

We wish Ronald the very best with these events.

 

Back to to

 

22 April 2013: Neal James' latest book, 'Full Marks' featured on Amber Glow Books' Blog.

Follow the link to view.

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book is titled Full Marks, released in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

12 April 2013: Heanor author, Neal James in Nottingham Post's Author Spotlight feature following the release of his fifth book.

Read the feature below.

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds', 'Threads of Deceit' and his latest book - Full Marks.

 

 

Back to to

 

10 April 2013: Ronald Ooms' Silver Eagle has been featured in the Belgian's Gazet van Antwerpen, one of the biggest newspapers in Belgium. The article is written in Dutch.

Read the feature

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

01 April 2013: How you can follow in writer's footsteps - Neal James' latest book 'Full Marks' receives great publicity boost in the Leicester Mercury and Blog Talk Radio.

 

Leicester Mercury Feature Snippet

WHILE working as a financial controller in Leicester, Philip Neale dreamed of becoming a published crime author. But he knew that thousands of would-be writers shared that ambition and that most would be rejected, their precious work left to gather dust on the shelf at home.

But the accountant's persistence paid off and, in 2008, his novel A Ticket to Tewkesbury provided the breakthrough.

He's gone on to publish four more books with the latest addition to his bibliography, Full Marks, released earlier this month.

Leicester, like the rest of the East Midlands where he has always lived and worked, remains an inspiration – his serial killer novel Two Little Dicky Birds opens with the murder of a prostitute on the streets of Leicester.

"It's the book I'm most pleased with," says Philip.

He's also planning to expand his fanbase by branching out into science fiction. He has written 80,000 words so far of his debut in the genre, The Rings of Darelius.

But he admits that he has been lucky and knows that many writers would love to get as far.

He says: "You just don't know. Pneuma Springs just looked at my work and said 'here's a contract'. I thought it was too good to be true – but it wasn't. They have done an enormous amount for me."

 

Read the full Leicester Mercury feature

 

Click to listen to an interview with Neal James on the Blog Talk Radio station in Michigan, USA.

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds', 'Threads of Deceit' and  Full Marks.

 

Back to to

 

22 March 2013: Author Neal James interviewed by Nat Wood, M/M Romance Stories Blog, an insightful discussion of Neal's latest book Full Marks.

 

Interview Snippet

Firstly, tell us five things about yourself.
1. I’m an accountant by trade, and have been in this line of work since 1974
2. I’m 60 years old, and have been married for 36 of those
3. I’ve been writing since 2006
4. I now have five books out on general release and available worldwide
5. There are three completed manuscripts, two partially written books, and two more ideas on the drawing board

When did you decide you wanted to be an author?
2007, when one of my short stories made it into a full-length novel and was accepted by a publisher in Kent.

How did you choose to write the genre you do and are there any genres that you would like to write some day?
Crime just seemed to follow naturally from my first novel, ‘A Ticket to Tewkesbury’, but I’m not restricted to that genre. My anthology ‘Short Stories Volume One’, published in 2009, contains 36 pieces of varying styles.

Tell us about your writing technique. Do you plan out every chapter detail beforehand or write as you go? Is there a particular environment and situation that helps to aid your writing?
As an accountant I use a spreadsheet to control the structure of the plot, and MS Word for a more detailed outline of the text. Each chapter is laid out to ensure that I don’t make continuity or anachronistic mistakes. I can write pretty much anywhere when the ideas come to me, but background noise (radio, record player) is very distracting.

 

Read the full interview

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds', 'Threads of Deceit' and  Full Marks.

 

Back to to

 

15 March 2013: Candid reviews of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall'

 

Reviews:

“Clancy Lyall was a tough Texas farm boy who entered World War II as a 16-year-old paratrooper, fought, survived, and thrived alongside of a company of elite soldiers, then reenlisted and fought in both Korea and Vietnam. This is a powerful and warm-hearted story of an American hero, a must-read for any fan of the Band of Brothers.”

— Marcus Brotherton, author of We Who Are Alive & Remain

 

"Clancy Lyall was one of the Band of Brothers lesser-known, unsung, heroes. A veteran who transferred into Easy Company after being wounded in Normandy, he fought beside Dick Winters and the others through Holland, Belgium and on to Adolf Hitler's Eagle Nest on a Bavarian mountaintop. The book is like having an informal, one-on-one, chat with Lyall, filled with rich detail and little known facts of the man known as Silver Eagle."

— Larry Alexander, bestselling author of "Biggest Brother: The Life of Major Dick Winters, the Man Who Led the Band of Brothers"

 

"Anyone interested in the fighting men behind 'Band of Brothers' will enjoy 'Silver Eagle.' This book highlights the end of an era as Clancy Lyall's personal story is told in his own words, which although occasionally naïve, illustrate a time where values and conduct were second to none - absorb and enjoy."

— Ian Gardner, Co-Author of 'Tonight We Die As Men' and author of 'Deliver Us From Darkness.'

 

 

Ronald Ooms is the author of ‘Silver Eagle - The Official Biography Of “Band Of Brothers” Veteran Clancy Lyall’

 

Back to to

 

12 March 2013: Neal James will be signing copies of his latest book, Full Marks, at Waterstones Nottingham.

 

Waterstones Nottingham

Date: Saturday, 18 May 2013

Time: 10am start, all day

Address: Waterstones 1/5 Bridlesmith Gate GB - Nottingham NG1 2GR

 

Further details: Tel: 0843 290 8525

E-mail: enquiries@nottingham.waterstones.com

Site: http://www.waterstones.com

 

If you are unable to attend the event. Waterstones can often reserve signed copies. Please contact the host shop for details.

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

We wish Neal James the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

04 March 2013: 'The Assembly Room', 'Whittington Manor' and 'When Payday Loans Go Wrong' are in The People's Book Prize 2013 SPRING Collection. Voting is open to all Readers.

 

We encourage all our authors and readers to get the books or borrow from their local libraries and cast their votes for these books.

 

The People's Book Prize entry links:

The Assembly Room - Children/YA Category

Whittington Manor - Fiction Category

When Payday Loans Go Wrong - Non-fiction Category

 

The public has almost 3 months to vote for your title: 1st March 2013 – 20th May 2013. The 3 authors with the most votes in the category will become finalists.

Voting will then take place from 21st May 2013 to 29th May 2013 for the public to choose the overall winners who will be announced at the 4rd Award Ceremony of The People’s Book Prize on 29th May 2013.

 

The People's Book Prize is the unique democratic Book Prize voted exclusively by the public so it is the public who choose Britain's Next Bestsellers. Its goals are to discover new and unknown works, eradicate illiteracy and support reading uniting the community as a whole.

Supported by Patron Frederick Forsyth CBE the Award consists of prizes in three genres – fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, The Beryl Bainbridge Award for First Time Author in honour of TPBP founding patron and as last year’s the Award for Best Achievement.

 

Authors

Bryony Allen is the author of three books: 'Mystery Deceit and a School Inspector' and 'OTOLI'. Bryony's latest book is 'The Assembly Room'.

Claire Voet is the author of Whittington Manor. Claire's latest book - 'The Other Daddy - A World Away' is due out in Summer 2013.

Steve Perry is the author of the new book - 'When Payday Loans Go Wrong'.

 

We wish Bryony, Claire and Steve the very best with this event.

 

Back to to

 

21 February 2013: Listen While You Lunch-With Mystery and Sci-Fi writer, Neal James.

Fancy a break from the workplace or a sit down after doing the shopping? Join us for a talk and Q&A with Mystery and Sci-Fi writer Neal James. The event will conclude with a book signing. Feel free to bring along your sandwiches! Complimentary tea and coffee are available.


Venue: Central Library*
Dates and times: Monday18th March 2013, 12.10pm to 1.00pm
How to book: Free event, no booking required

View event page

 

*Central Library
The Wardwick
Derby
DE1 1HS

Phone: 01332 641702
Email: central.library@derby.gov.uk

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

06 February 2013: Interview with Author Neal James, an insightful discussion of his latest book Full Marks.

Read the interview

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

15 February 2013: Listen to Neal James' interview on Webb Weaver Books, the Blog Talk Radio station.

The show was aired on Thursday, 7th February 2013 in the company of hosts CK Webb and DJ Weaver.

 

Click to listen to the feature audio clip. (OR listen via the player below).

 

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

07 February 2013: Neal James will be signing copies of his latest book, Full Marks, at Waterstones Derby.

 

Waterstones Derby

Date: Saturday, 11 May 2013

Time: 10am start, all day

Address: Waterstones Derby St. Peters, 78-80 St Peter's Street, Derby DE1 1SR

 

Further details: Tel: 0843 290 8273

E-mail: manager@derby.waterstones.com

Site: http://www.waterstones.com

 

 

If you are unable to attend the event. Waterstones can often reserve signed copies. Please contact the host shop for details.

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

We wish Neal James the very best with these event.

 

Back to to

 

06 February 2013: Interview with Author Neal James, an insightful discussion of his latest book Full Marks.

Read the interview

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

04 February 2013: Heanor Author Releases his Fifth Book.

Read the feature

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

29 January 2013: Neal James, author of a new crime novel has been featured in the Ripley & Heanor News.

A Heanor author has published a new crime novel about a detective fighting to clear his name while investigating a powerful conspiracy.

Read the press cutting

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

23 January 2013: "...All together a brilliant read which I found difficult to put down." A review of 'Onwards and Upwards'.

 

The review: Onwards and Upwards

"As I said in my review of 'Dane Mills Bosley' Chris Pownall and I were in the same class at secondary school in the mid 1950s but this is not the reason why I have given it a 5 star rating.

This is the third book of Chris Pownall that I have read and I think that it is the best. Some of the stories in it are 'howlers'. From his fear of hospitals and the 'white coat' syndrome to his caravanning exploits which are hilarious, and his pet hates. I think that most of us will associate themselves with some of these stories but Chris has had the courage to put them in writing. I particularly liked his smokey barbecue which nearly sent the rest of the campsite to hospital and the way that he 'jumped the queue' of those waiting in the National Trust car park; clever that. He also takes you on memorable days out with his family - up in a Glider over Leek and a trip to Dublin. However, I particularly enjoyed the descriptive detail of his trips to China in May 2009 and Australia in January 2010. I felt as if I was there on the journey with him and viewing all of the sights and hearing all of the sounds. He concludes by giving a potted history of some of the people who he has met and who have influenced his life. I personally knew one of them and can confirm that the content is correct. All together a brilliant read which I found difficult to put down. I can’t wait for the next book by Chris Pownall."

Clive Wright, Congleton Cheshire

 

Chris Pownall is the author of Dane Mills Bosley, and the following three books: 'Funny How Things Work Out', 'Onwards and Upwards' and 'A Long Journey Back'

 

Back to to

 

21 January 2013: Neal James' books featured on Tim Northburg's 'The Darth Writer' Blog.

Follow the links to view.

Author Spotlight #30 - Neal James - Two Little Dicky Birds

Neal James Follow Up - Derbyshire author, Neal James, releases his fifth book – ‘Full Marks’

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

17 January 2013: Listen to Neal James' interview on a book talk radio show, The Reading Circle with Marc Medley.

The show was aired on Saturday 12 January 2013, WP88.7 FM Brave New Radio.

 

Click to listen to the feature audio clip. (OR listen via the player below).

 

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

15 January 2013: ...the stories are amusing, witty and entertaining... A review of 'Funny How Things Work Out'.

 

The review: Funny How Things Work Out

"If you have read 'Dane Mills Bosley', by the same author, then you must read this one as in my view, it is even better. It follows Chris Pownall journey from his early days at Primary School and names one or two fellow pupils who influenced his early life through to his days in the Merchant Navy, which are a real eye opener as he travelled the world, then onto his 40 years of employment with James Walker. Some of the stories are amusing, witty and entertaining and I, quite frankly, could not put the book down until I had finished it. It contains a few 'malapropisms' but to me these add to the overall enjoyment of the book. I have read a lot of books by some well established authors but none more entertaining and 'readable' than this one."

Clive Wright, Congleton Cheshire

 

Chris Pownall is the author of Dane Mills Bosley, and the following three books: 'Funny How Things Work Out', 'Onwards and Upwards' and 'A Long Journey Back'

 

Back to to

 

14 January 2013: The Derby Telegraph invites readers to submit short stories. Here is a piece by Neal James, titled 'A Friend in Need'

Click link to read article here...

 

 

© Article and image source - Derby Telegraph

 

 

Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'. Neal's latest book titled Full Marks, is due out in Springs 2013.

 

 

Back to to

 

10 January 2013: A review of John Butler's miscellany of short stories 'Serendipity', by Irene Truman*, a critical reviewer for the Bronte Gazette.

 

The Review

"Serendipity is a ‘Magic box of delights’.

The author waves his wand and out come amazing stories of adventure, humour, initiative, nostalgia and chance.

Sir Edward Elgar portrayed friends and family through music in his ‘Enigma Variations’. In Serendipity we observe people John Butler knew through the written word.

Short stories are snapshots of people and places. Writing stories enables the author to really get to the bottom of something, rather than wander through life in an amorphous bubble.

Like a Magic Box Serendipity allures with clever use of pun, alliteration, metaphor and simile; such as ‘flying filth’ and ‘minnows of boys like pilot fish leading a whale shark’…and many others.

The author’s enthusiasm and joy in writing Serendipity shines through. In ‘It gives me great pleasure’ he admits ‘The power of the word makes the mind boggle.’

The stories are brief but perfectly constructed and of infinite variety.

So dip your toe into this special collection or take a plunge; you will not be disappointed."

Irene Truman

 

*Irene Truman has been a member of the Bronte Society for fifteen years and has written critical reviews for the Bronte Gazette. She is a professional teacher for musicians and a steward and tour guide at Harewood House.

 

John Butler is the author of Serendipity - A miscellany of short stories’ and 'In Search Of Ireland Again'.

 

Back to to

 

05 January 2013: The Damocles Legacy - a short story by author Neal James*, featured on Amber Valley Info Website.


The Damocles Legacy

The first arrival had appeared as a steadily brightening light in the eastern sky, and had approached with an increasing intensity over a period of almost two weeks. To the general population it had seemed at first nothing more than the usual amount of activity within the solar system, caused by space debris which would inevitably burn out in the upper atmosphere as it approached. There would be a brief and spectacular light show, and then everyone would go back to whatever it was that they had been doing before its arrival. This time however, it was different.

The object slowed its rate of approach, and came to rest at a distance of about one thousand miles from the surface. It was still too far away for the amateur astrologists amongst the population to make out any details, but all governments’ resources had been trained upon it since surveillance satellites orbiting the planet had detected its signature more than a month earlier. At a hastily convened conference, leaders of the major powers met to decide upon the best means of approach to an alien vessel which had clearly come in response to a variety of mechanised probes launched throughout the previous millennium.

Amidst growing concern, and a disturbingly agitated set of demands from the hawks amongst the gathering, a decision was taken to step up the global security level to 4, one mark short of a war footing alert. Those members with positions on the Security Council were more cautious in their approach, and a proposal was carried at full meeting to step up communication attempts on all of their known channels to the ‘visitor’. Initial radio messages had gone unanswered, but experts in universal language techniques had been working night and day to refine all programs in order to widen the range. For the moment, all inter-racial disputes were forgotten, and weaponry of every kind was on the move to positions of maximum effect should they be required. There was no doubt that these manoeuvres would not have gone unnoticed by whatever populated the craft now stationary over the largest continental block on the planet’s surface.

As more and more attempts at reaching out were seemingly ignored, a sense of panic began to spread invidiously. Like some airborne viral infection, it afflicted everyone but the fanatically religious within days. Those sects took to the mountains in celebration of the fulfilment of ancient prophesies laid down in all of the sacred texts. All differences now forgotten, they proclaimed the return of the messianic being promised to them millennia before.

Secular authorities chose quite a different path. With all armaments now trained in the same direction, and the multiplicity of communication attempts redundant, the first belligerent actions were taken. In response to intercontinental rivalry, satellite laser weapons had been deployed many centuries before. A prolonged stand-off, fuelled by ever increasing expenditure on maintenance and development, had almost brought the entire planet to the brink of an Armageddon, and this had only been averted by a strategic arms limitation treaty signed even as weapons were being primed for use. This arsenal was now reconfigured and retargeted in the same direction. All that was needed was a single word of command.

The disappearance of the vessel was sudden and completely unexpected. One moment it was there, exactly where it had been stationed for the past few weeks, the next it was gone. The initial outpouring of general relief amongst the global population was shared by neither those of a religious persuasion, who saw it as nothing more than a delay in the inevitable, nor the government leaders attending the initial conference. Amidst all the general rejoicing there was an ominous calm along the planet-wide corridors of power, and despite repeated media requests for comment, no leader could be persuaded to voice an opinion. All global satellite surveillance equipment remained on full alert and focussed in the same direction as the first approach. They waited.

Click link to read full story here...

 

*Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

 

Back to to

 

01 January 2013: Neal James will be interviewed on a book talk radio show, The Reading Circle with Marc Medley on Saturday 12 January 2013.

 

The show will be aired live on WP88.7 FM Brave New Radio Listen on Saturdays 6:00 a.m. - 7:00 a.m. ET (11am UK time).

Find out About The Host


Neal James is the author of four books: 'A Ticket to Tewkesbury', 'Short Stories - Volume One', 'Two Little Dicky Birds' and 'Threads of Deceit'.

 

We wish Neal James the very best with this event.

 

Back to top

 

 

Read more news - Authors News-Archive 2014

 

 

Back to top

 

 

Read more news - Authors News-Archive 2012

 

 

Back to top

 

 

Read more news - Authors News-Archive 2011

 

 

Back to top

 

 

Read more news - Authors News-Archive 2010

 

 

Back to top

 

 

  

 

HOME  I  PUBLISHING  I  CONTACT  I  LINKS  I  BOOKSTORE

 

Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy and Disclaimer.

Emails Webmaster with questions or comments about this web site.

 

Copyright © 2003 - 2017 Pneuma Springs Ltd. All rights reserved. Company number: 04690406 Registered in England and Wales

 

Pneuma Springs Publishing - a division of Pneuma Springs Ltd